News and Updates

Publication Update: Just Waiting on Congress

We’re in that tedious part of the final stages of publication: we’ve done all we can do, and now we’re waiting on other people to do their part. Specifically, we’re waiting on the Library of Congress to issue us a control number. That’s the last thing before Ten Parts in the King goes to the printer. Then we get to work with the printer to make sure the proof is just right, and when we’re all satisfied, the print run begins.

Sounds tedious, doesn’t it? But fear not! Every day gets us one step closer to having this work available to the reading public. In the meantime, we’re gathering our thoughts for follow-on articles on this website. With Ten Parts in the King as the foundation, we hope to present a continuing series of posts to expand on subjects we just didn’t have opportunity to cover adequately in the book.

Thomas Jefferson was instrumental in establishing the Library of Congress as the national library of the United States. Now we’re only waiting on the LOC to record our book before it goes to print!

Keep watching this site! We’ll provide updates as the news comes in. In the meantime, if you’re inclined to help finance the first printing, click on the donate button below. We have had tremendous response in the last two weeks, and are only a few hundred dollars short of the full amount. Thank you to everyone who has helped us get this far!

To donate any amount, please click on the button below: That’s all for now! If you have any questions, please contact us at editor@tenpartsintheking.com. And, help us spread the word!


© Albert J. McCarn and Peter G. Rambo, 2017, all rights reserved.  For requests to use and/or duplicate original material on Ten Parts in the King send a request at the Contact Us page, or send email to editor@tenpartsintheking.com.
News and Updates

Publication Update: Manuscript is Complete!

The Empire of David and Solomon (Rand McNally Bible Atlas, 1910)

We took a major step forward this week with Ten Parts in the King. After months of work, with input from some very dedicated, knowledgeable, and helpful readers, the manuscript is complete!

What’s next? Glad you asked!

This week, we are working with Key of David Publishing to take care of those important legal and financial details to prepare the way for sending the manuscript to the printer. We already have an estimate for the initial print run, and we are very encouraged that it’s about $3,000 – about what we expected. Once we have half of that amount in hand, and have the copyright and other details settled, we can send the job off to the printer. After that, it should take about a month before the book is available.

We have had questions about when we’ll be accepting preorders. We expect to do that as soon as the book goes to the printer. If you are receiving our publication updates, you will be among the first to know!

How long before the book goes to the printer? That is a question you can help us answer!

Key of David is a small publishing company, and doesn’t (yet) have the funds on hand to cover even these modest printing costs. Therefore, we are asking for help from our readers in raising the money for the initial printing. 

To donate any amount, please click on the button below: Thanks to generous friends, we already have nearly $1000 in hand. Will you help us go the rest of the way? Join us in this important endeavor by making a donation toward the first printing. Any donations in excess of that amount will be rolled into successive printings. Consider this an investment, not only in Ten Parts in the King, but in the groundbreaking work that is the hallmark of Key of David Publishing! 

The last bit of news is that we are thinking about a book launching event or two. We’ll be able to fill in the details of when and where once we have an idea when the book will be published. For now, the thought is to have the book launching either in Columbia, South Carolina or in Charlotte, North Carolina – or maybe an event in each location!  Please let us know your thoughts!

That’s all for now! If you have any questions, please contact us at editor@tenpartsintheking.com. And help us spread the word!


© Albert J. McCarn and Peter G. Rambo, 2017, all rights reserved.  For requests to use and/or duplicate original material on Ten Parts in the King send a request at the Contact Us page, or send email to editor@tenpartsintheking.com.
Sample Content

Pictured in a Parable

From the Introduction to Ten Parts in the King

The Death of Absalom (Gustave Doré)

There is an account in the scriptures that presents a prophetic picture of this process. It concerns the aftermath of the civil war in Israel that erupted when Absalom usurped the throne from his father David (2 Samuel 15-18). When David’s loyal forces had defeated the rebels in battle on the eastern side of the Jordan River, the king prepared to return across the river to regain his throne in Jerusalem. This is where we find a peculiar turn of events:

Then King David sent to Zadok and Abiathar the priests, saying, “Speak to the elders of Judah, saying, ‘Why are you the last to bring the king back to his house, since the word of all Israel has come to the king, even to his house? You are my brothers; you are my bone and my flesh. Why then should you be the last to bring back the king?’ Say to Amasa, ‘Are you not my bone and my flesh? May God do so to me, and more also, if you will not be commander of the army before me continually in place of Joab.’” Thus he turned the hearts of all the men of Judah as one man, so that they sent word to the king, saying, “Return, you and all your servants.” The king then returned and came as far as the Jordan. And Judah came to Gilgal in order to go to meet the king, to bring the king across the Jordan. (2 Samuel 19:11-15)

Why would Judah not reclaim their king? Perhaps because the rebellion against him originated from within Judah; when Absalom claimed the throne, he did so from Hebron, the city of Judah where David first reigned over his own tribe and House (2 Samuel 5:4-5, 15:7-12). Doubtless there was a large degree of shame involved, particularly on the part of Amasa, the Judean commander of Absalom’s army. Nevertheless, the king would not return until his own kin acknowledged him and welcomed him back – something which another son of David said many centuries later: Please click here to continue reading